Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

90

Date

2010

Date of Award

7-28-2010

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Experimental Psychology

Committee Chair

Graesser Art

Committee Member

Lowther Deborah

Committee Member

McNamara Danielle

Committee Member

Craig Scotty

Abstract

AbstractThe purpose of this study was to test the effects of cognitive disequilibrium on student question generation while interacting with an intelligent tutoring system. Students were placed in a state of cognitive disequilibrium while they interacted with AutoTutor on topics of computer literacy. The students were tutored on three topics in computer literacy: hardware, operating system, and the internet. During the course of the study a confederate was present to answer any questions that the participant may have had. Additional analyses examined any potential influence the confederates had on student question asking. Lastly, the study explored the relationship between emotions and cognitive disequilibrium. More specifically, the study examined the temporal relationship between confusion and student generated questions. Based on previous cognitive disequilibrium literature, it was predicted that students who were placed in a state of cognitive disequilibrium would generate a significantly higher proportion of question than participants who were not placed in a state of cognitive disequilibrium. Additionally, it was predicted that students who were placed in a state of cognitive disequilibrium would generate “better” questions than participants who were not in a state of cognitive disequilibrium. Results revealed that participants who were not placed in a state of cognitive disequilibrium generated a significantly higher proportion of questions. Furthermore, there were no significant differences found between participants for deep or intermediate questions. Results did reveal significant main effects as a function of time for certain action units. Lastly, it was discovered that certain measures of individual differences were significant predictors of student question generation.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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