Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

702

Date

2012

Date of Award

8-3-2012

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Clinical Psychology

Committee Chair

J. Gayle Beck

Committee Member

Frank Andrasik

Committee Member

Helen Sable

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive societal problem that can result in poor mental health outcomes among women who are exposed to this type of trauma. Among the most prevelant forms of psychological outcomes that develop in the aftermath of trauma are Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression. These disorders are often comorbid folllowing IPV, which serves to exacerbate the overall severity of posttrauma psychopathology. To date, little is known regarding factors that contribute to the comorbid relationship between PTSD and depression, as well as factors that independently contribute to each form of pathology following IPV. The present study examined cognitive appraisals that are unique to PTSD and depression, as well as appraisals that are common to these disorders in 113 IPVsurvivors. Cognitive appraisals of global threat, guilt, depression cognition, and negative self concept (negative self thoughts, guilt, shame) were examined in their relation to PTSD and depression. Results indicated that negative self concept was significantly associated with PTSD. As well, depression cognition were significantly associated with depression. None of the other cognitive appraisals emerged as significant predictors of PTSD or depression. Overall, these results suggest that specific cognitive factors may be important in maintaining PTSD and depression after IPV trauma. Treatment efforts for IPV survivors should consider addressing appraisals of negative self concept for women experiencing symptoms of PTSD. For depression symptomatology, interventions targeting depression cognitions may be important for IPV survivors.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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