Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

804

Date

2013

Date of Award

4-18-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Computer Science

Committee Chair

Scott D. Fleming

Committee Member

King-Ip Lin

Committee Member

Linda Sherrell

Abstract

Over the past fifteen years, numerous studies have pointed to the considerable potential of pair programming (e.g., improving software quality). Using the technique, two programmers work together on a single computer, and take turns driving, typing and controlling the mouse, and navigating, monitoring the work and offering suggestions. However, being a complex human activity, there are still many questions about pair programming and its moderating factors. In this paper, we report on a grounded theory study of seven pairs that addresses open questions regarding partner teaching, navigator contributions to tasks, the impact of partner interruptions, and navigator engagement in the task. Key findings of our study included (1) that all pairs exhibited episodes of teaching, (2) that navigators contributed numerous ideas to the task that were acted upon (most without discussion), (3) that pairs exhibited almost no indications of partner disruption to their flow, and (4) that navigators rarely disengaged.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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