Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

811

Date

2013

Date of Award

4-17-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

James G Murphy

Committee Member

Leslie Robinson

Committee Member

William Dwyer

Abstract

Approximately 45% of college students report binge drinking (five drinks in an occasion for men and four for women) in the previous two weeks. This pattern of drinking is associated with dangerously high blood alcohol content, which is related to a number of health risks and consequences. College drinking is sensitive to price and next-day classes. This study investigated the impact of a variety of next-day responsibilities on drinking estimates using a hypothetical alcohol consumption task in a sample of binge drinkers (N = 80). The impact of class start time was also assessed. Drinking was significantly lower in all responsibility conditions relative to the no-responsibility condition, with internships producing the greatest change; earlier class times produced a greater reduction in drinking than later start times. The results suggest that increasing morning responsibilities (especially internships and volunteering ) may be effective in preventing and reducing binge drinking in college students.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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