Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

812

Date

2013

Date of Award

4-17-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Journalism

Committee Chair

David Arant

Committee Member

Carrie Brown

Committee Member

Thomas Hrach

Abstract

The mainstream press and the United States government have found harmony in the still relatively undefined rules regarding the balance between national security and free press. While the government tried a handful of individuals and groups under the Espionage Act in the early 20th century, the press has avoided such trials. Even during the Pentagon Papers case, the government only sought an injunction against publication, which was ultimately not supported by the Supreme Court of the United States. The 21st century presents a new set of challenges for this unwritten peace. Wikileaks may be the proverbial guinea pig in determining how the balance between national security and an informed public will be interpreted in the new, digital century. This thesis explores what changes the organization could face, what an impact such a precedent could have on the future of journalism, and how the American public may be better served with a legislative, rather than judicial, solution.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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