Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

884

Date

2013

Date of Award

5-31-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

James Murphy

Committee Member

William Dwyer

Committee Member

Meghan McDevitt-Murphy

Abstract

Amidst the efforts to understand the impact of occupational stress on military personnel, researchers have turned their attention to resilience. In a sample of active-duty Navy personnel, positive and negative coping strategies were explored as predictors of two resilience dichotomies (resilient vs. non-resilient).Positive coping strategies were expected to predict resilience, and negative coping strategies were expected to predict non-resilience.The results from two hierarchical binary logistic regression analyses demonstrated that seeking command support, praying/meditating, and arguing demonstrated statistically significant associations with resilience that were consistent with the hypotheses. Other coping strategies of interest, however, failed to demonstrate statistically significant associations with resilience.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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