Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

908

Date

2013

Date of Award

7-17-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Criminal Justice

Committee Chair

Bert Burraston

Committee Member

KB Turner

Committee Member

Margaret Vandiver

Abstract

Differential association and social learning theories explain how individuals learn deviant behavior through traditional in-person social interaction. Online social networking has paved the way for the younger generation to interact with their peer group using a distinctly different method. The purpose of this research is to take an exploratory approach in examining the relationship between online interaction and personal behavior. The current study examined 583 University of Memphis undergraduate students' self-reported personal deviant behavior, as well as the deviant behavior found within their online social networks. Results support the hypothesis that exposure to deviant behavior on online social networks is a predictor of personal deviant behavior. Moderating variables were introduced via multivariate analyses and were found to affect the strength of the relationship between the two sets of behaviors.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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