Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

933

Date

2013

Date of Award

7-23-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Instr and Curr Leadership

Concentration

Special Education

Committee Chair

Laura Baylot-Casey

Committee Member

James N Meindl

Committee Member

Robert L Williamson

Committee Member

Neal D Miller

Abstract

The primary goal of this study was to investigate the correlation between environmental stimuli (e.g., barometric pressure) and aggressive behaviors emitted by an individual with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Specifically, the researcher measured barometric pressure with a data-logging instrument (designed and built by the primary researcher) in a ¬clinical setting where adults with ASD and challenging high-intensity behaviors (e.g. self-injurious behavior and physical aggression) reside. Relationships between the selected variables were examined quantitatively using binary logistic regression in an effort to statistically analyze if the environmental conditions might be a setting event for aggressive behaviors for the participant studied. Outcomes of this study indicated that barometric pressure did not influence aggressive behavior for the participant studied at the alpha < .05 significance level. Limitations and suggestions for future research are provided.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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