Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

952

Date

2013

Date of Award

7-29-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Sociology

Committee Chair

Martin L. Levin

Committee Member

Anna S. Mueller

Committee Member

Jeni Loftus

Abstract

The objectives of this study are to determine the effects of weight, weight perception, and physical attractiveness on suicide ideation among adolescents and adults. Further, this research aims to determine whether this effect differs by gender and race.This study employs the public-use version of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Waves I through IV (N=6,504). Odds ratios are estimated to determine whether actual or perceived weight is a better predictor of suicide ideation, and whether measures of interviewer-rated attractiveness or self-rated attractiveness predict suicide ideation. Analyses reveal that perception of self is the most important predictor of suicide ideation. Among white and black adolescents, suicide ideation is more likely to occur among those who perceive that they are of a non-normal weight. Among white and black adults, suicide ideation is more likely to occur among those who perceive that they are “very unattractive” or “unattractive.”

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

Share

COinS