Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

961

Date

2013

Date of Award

11-7-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Biomedical Engineering

Committee Chair

Amy Curry

Committee Member

Helena Parfenova

Committee Member

Brian Kelly

Abstract

Seizures, a common form of neurological dysfunction in newborns, occur when large groups of neurons fire in a synchronous and excessive manner. During seizures, cerebral vessels dilate to match excessive neuronal activation via increased heart rate, blood pressure, and cerebral blood flow. We hypothesized that cerebral hypothermia has beneficial neuronal, cerebrovascular, and systemic effects in neonatal seizures. Bicuculline, a GABAA receptor blocker, produces sustained seizure activity in neonatal piglets for over two hours. Electrocorticogram recordings provided no evidence that excessive neuronal activation or cerebral vasodilation were mitigated by hypothermia. These novel data suggest that cerebral hypothermia has no anticonvulsant effects and does not prevent the cerebral blood flow increase in neonatal seizures. Head cooling greatly reduced ictal tachycardia and attenuated blood pressure responses, indicating potential systemic benefits of cerebral hypothermia. Collectively, this study shows promise for the therapeutic capabilities of cerebral hypothermia during neonatal seizures.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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