Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1077

Date

2014

Date of Award

4-22-2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Major

Higher and Adult Education

Concentration

Higher Education

Committee Chair

Mitsunori Misawa

Committee Member

Larry McNeal

Committee Member

Barbara Mullins Nelson

Committee Member

William Akey

Abstract

Bullying has graduated from high school to college and occurs in higher education. The proliferation of electronic technology has provided a new forum for bullies to harm victims. That is, bullies transmit harmful text messages, photos or video over the Internet and other digital communication devices to victims. This malpractice of technology oriented phenomenon known as cyberbullying has become a social problem. College students who have been cyberbullied have committed suicide, dropped out or endured torment while in school. However, limited research exists on cyberbullying in higher education. The purpose of this research was to examine cyberbullying in the context of higher education to reveal the characteristics, prevalence, and impact of cyberbullying on college students at an urban research university in the South. The study was based on a questionnaire of undergraduate college students between the ages of 18 and 24. Of the 140 participants who responded to the questionnaire, 12% were cyberbullied, 6% were not sure whether they had been cyberbullied, and 82% had not been cyberbullied. Frequent forms of cyberbullying involved looking at cell phones, reading emails, gossiping online, making fun of others online, and calling people mean names online. Methods most used to cyberbully were Facebook, Twitter, cellphone, and texting. Cyberbullying most likely occurred based on one's sexual orientation and race. Victims indicated that cyberbullying made them feel angry and hurt and they considered dropping out of college or it made it harder for them to concentrate on their studies.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

Share

COinS