Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1120

Date

2014

Date of Award

4-25-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Health and Sport Science

Concentration

Exercise and Sport Science

Committee Chair

Maxime Paquette

Committee Member

Brian Schilling

Committee Member

Yuhua Li

Committee Member

Robert Townsend

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of agility training in different footwear on agility, speed and balance performance in healthy young adults. Twenty-four subjects went through a six-week agility training intervention in one of three footwear groups: barefoot, minimal footwear or traditional shoes. No group and time interactions were found but significant time main effects indicated that agility and balance performance improved from baseline to post-test. Specifically, reaction time, foot speed, static balance and, change of direction sprints were all improved as early as two weeks into the intervention, with improvements continuing through the entire six-week intervention. The lack of an interaction with time main effects suggests that specific reaction time and foot speed agility training improves agility, speed and balance performance over a six week period regardless of the type of footwear worn.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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