Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1129

Date

2014

Date of Award

4-28-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Civil Engineering

Concentration

Transportation Engineering

Committee Chair

Stephanie Salyers Ivey

Committee Member

Marian Levy

Committee Member

Sabya Mishra

Committee Member

Mihalis Golias

Abstract

Community livability is increasingly being examined and promoted as exemplary practice. The impact of freight on an urban community is significant, yet in the United States few efforts have been devoted to better understanding the concept. A pilot-scale project was conducted in Memphis, Tennessee in a region with heavy freight traffic. Following a broad literature review of globally applied strategies for enhancing livability and solving problems caused by freight, a survey was conducted of various residential stakeholders regarding their perceived definition of livability, barriers to livability, and impact of freight on the livability of their communities. Survey results were analyzed to identify priorities for a livable community and to explore the differences between freight-centric and non-freight-centric responses. Transportation related strategies that may provide a way to enhance livability were also evaluated based on their applicability in Memphis, Tennessee as well as their general applicability and effectiveness in the United States.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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