Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1155

Author

Brandi Hill

Date

2014

Date of Award

5-29-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Art History

Concentration

Egyptian Art and Archaeology

Committee Chair

Patricia V. Podzorski

Committee Member

Lorelei Corcoran

Committee Member

Suzanne Onstine

Abstract

In this study, I will argue that royal women during the ancient Egyptian Twelfth Dynasty held high social and political status that was part of a gradual increase that had began in the Old Kingdom and is clearly seen from the Sixth Dynasty onwards. This can be seen through the acquisition of kingly iconographic attributes (including the uraeus, cartouche, style of artistic representation, etc.), the evolving titulary, and the burial complexes of the royal women. In addition to a detailed study of these elements which define royal female roles and authority, I will examine certain theories made by previous scholars regarding the status of royal women. This thesis presents a corpus of every published representation of Twelfth Dynasty royal women that I could locate, an updated titulary table chronologically organized, and plans of late Old Kingdom, Eleventh Dynasty and Dynasty Twelve royal female mortuary complexes.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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