Title

The relationship between caffeine and blood pressure in preadolescent african american girls

Abstract

Background: While high caffeine consumption has been shown to be associated with increased blood pressure in controlled experiments, the relationship between caffeine consumption and blood pressure in preado-lescent (ages 6-11 years) and adolescent (ages 12-19 years) children has not been well studied. The primary objective of this study was to assess the cross-sectional relationship between caffeine intake and blood pressure in 8- to 10-year-old African American girls who eat an unrestricted diet. Methods: Demographic, 24-hour dietary recall, and blood pressure data collected at baseline from 303 African American girls aged 8-10 years in the Girls health Enrichment Multisite Studies (GEMS) cohort were analyzed by using linear and multiple regression models. Results: Dietary caffeine intake was not associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure (P=.33 and P=.36, respectively). However, consistent with the literature, height and body mass index were each positively and independently associated with systolic blood pressure (both P<.0001). Height and amount of sodium intake were positively associated with diastolic blood pressure (P=,01 and P=,02, respectively). Conclusions: Dietary caffeine intake in low amounts is not associated with elevated blood pressure in 8- to 10-year-old African American girls who eat an unrestricted diet.

Publication Title

Ethnicity and Disease

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