Title

The Future of Childhood Cancer Survivorship: Challenges and Opportunities for Continued Progress

Authors

Stephanie B. Dixon, Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, MS 735, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA. Electronic address: stephanie.dixon@stjude.org.
Eric J. Chow, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, M4-C308, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.
Lars Hjorth, Department of Paediatrics, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund 221 85, Sweden.
Melissa M. Hudson, Division of Cancer Survivorship, Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, MS 735, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.
Leontien C. Kremer, Princess Maxima Center, Heidelberglaan 25, Utrecht 3584 CS, Netherlands; Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Lindsay M. Morton, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9609 Medical Center Drive, MSC 9778, Bethesda, MD 20892-9778, USA.
Paul C. Nathan, Division of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Room 9402 Black Wing, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada.
Kirsten K. Ness, Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude. Children's Research Hospital, MS 735, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.
Kevin C. Oeffinger, Duke Center for Onco-Primary Care, Duke Cancer Institute, 2424 Erwin Drive, Suite 601, Durham, NC 27705, USA.
Gregory T. Armstrong, Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude. Children's Research Hospital, MS 735, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

Abstract

As treatment evolves and the population who survive childhood cancer ages and increases in number, researchers must use novel approaches to prevent, identify and mitigate adverse effects of treatment. Future priorities include collaborative efforts to pool large cohort data to improve detection of late effects, identify late effects of novel therapies, and determine the contribution of genetic factors along with physiologic and accelerated aging among survivors. This knowledge should translate to individual risk prediction and prevention strategies. Finally, we must utilize health services research and implementation science to improve adoption of survivorship care recommendations outside of specialized pediatric oncology centers.

Publication Title

Pediatric clinics of North America

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