Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

5993

Date

2017

Date of Award

7-19-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Major

Instr and Curr Leadership

Concentration

Instructional Design and Tech

Committee Chair

Trey Martindale

Committee Member

Deborah Lowther

Committee Member

Nathan Essex

Committee Member

Michelle Stockton

Abstract

The perceptions of faculty when implementing a technology-enhanced innovation, such as adaptive learning, into their higher education courses will give insight into areas of concern that administrators should consider addressing through the use of professional development and workshops. Ultimately, addressing faculty concerns and providing the needed support could impact the potential impact on student course outcomes. The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between faculty perceptions of implementing adaptive learning into their courses and course outcomes. The researcher sought to determine the concerns faculty have about implementing adaptive learning into their courses and how those concerns impacted a professor’s levels of use of adaptive learning and ultimately student course outcomes. The research design used to address the research questions was a mixed methods case study. The study examined quantitative data collected using SEDL’s Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ) and qualitative data using SEDL’s Levels of Use (LoU) interview protocol. Additionally, quantitative data on student’s levels of activity from the Realizeit adaptive learning platform was used to analyze the relationship between the professor’s LoU and course outcomes. The findings resulting from this study indicate that the lower the concerns, the greater the use. While the analyses of the data were found to be statistically significant, only a small amount of the variance was explained. Other, potentially stronger factors appear to impact the relationship between student use and course outcomes.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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