Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6650

Date

2020

Date of Award

12-23-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

Deranda Lester

Committee Member

Helen Sable

Committee Member

Leslie Robinson

Abstract

Factors relating to social interaction have been shown to alter patterns of psychostimulant use in preclinical and clinical models. The present study aimed to determine the effects of social isolation on nicotine preference using conditioned place preference (CPP) and the effects social isolation and nicotine exposure on reward-related dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Regarding CPP results, there was a significant housing (group or isolated) x drug (nicotine or saline) x trial interaction on time spent in the drug-paired chamber. Regarding dopamine recordings, there was a significant housing x drug exposure (nicotine or saline) x time (60 min recording period) interaction on percent change in dopamine half-life following cocaine. At cocaine's peak effect, isolation and nicotine exposure both independently increased this dopaminergic response, but an interactive effect between these variables was not significant. Identifying risk factors for drug abuse is critical for prevention and treatment programs.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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