Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

292

Date

2011

Date of Award

4-20-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Health and Sport Science

Concentration

Exercise and Sport Science

Committee Chair

Richard J. Bloomer

Committee Member

Zsolt Murlasits

Committee Member

Brian K. Schilling

Abstract

Two prevalent origins of oxidative stress in Western society are the ingestion of certain nutrients and exercise. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the magnitude of increase in oxidative stress following acute feeding and acute exercise. Twelve exercise-trained men consumed a high-fat meal or performed one of three exercise bouts, in a random order, cross-over design. Blood samples were assayed for malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and triglycerides (TAG). A significant condition effect was noted for MDA (p=0.01) and H2O2 (p<0.0001), with values highest for the meal condition. A trend was also noted for TAG (p=0.07), with values highest for the meal condition. These results illustrate that the magnitude of oxidative stress following a mealis significantly greater than the magnitude of oxidative stress elecitied after an acutebout of strenuous exercise, in a sample of healthy, exercise-trained men.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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