Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6761

Date

2021

Date of Award

11-12-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Biomedical Engineering

Committee Chair

Joel D Bumgardner

Committee Member

Kenneth Mark Anderson

Committee Member

Omar Skalli

Committee Member

Jessica Amber Jennings

Abstract

Raspberry ketone (RK) is a natural compound with anti-inflammatory properties that may benefit tissue healing. Effects of RK on inflammation and healing were evaluated by examining macrophage polarization in response to guided bone regeneration (GBR) membranes loaded with 0,100 or 500µg RK over 4 weeks in a rat calvarial model. Initially, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophage phenotypes remove damaged tissues and bacteria and then transition to pro-healing M2 phenotypes to coordinate tissue repair and formation in wounds. Immunohistochemical staining was used to characterize M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes using CD68 as a PAN macrophage marker, iNOS for M1 and CD206 for M2 phenotype. Results indicated membranes with 100µg RK facilitated M1 to M2 transition in comparison to higher 500 µg dose, at 2 weeks post implantation. Greater expression of M2 phenotypes is reported to positively effect osteogenesis in GBR process. Therefore, RK shows promise for promoting bone healing.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

Dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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