Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

517

Date

2012

Date of Award

4-15-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Art History

Concentration

Egyptian Art and Archaeology

Committee Chair

Nigel Strudwick

Committee Member

Lorelei Corcoran

Committee Member

Patricia Podzorski

Abstract

Throughout Ancient Egypt's history, the artistic style used in rendering human forms has been altered on multiple occasions for varying reasons. In three cases, during the later Old Kingdom, the late reign of Amenhotep III, and the Amarna period, it appears that the alterations of style can be attributed to similar religious motivations. Moreover, these styles similarly render characteristics of the body in a childlike manner. Each of these periods is discussed, identifying important characteristics that define each as a separate style type and noting the specific religious motivations that inspired them. In each instance, it appears that the paedomorphic features associated with these styles reflect the emphasis on daily and eternal rejuvination linked with the solar deities Ra and the Aten, and the chthonic deity Osiris, who rose to national importance during these periods.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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