Title

Using virtual worlds to investigate perceived affordances on learned navigation and objective location performance

Abstract

Navigation in virtual worlds is vital for users to move about effectively, complete objectives, and interact with one another and the environment. The ability to accurately orient oneself within a virtual world is essential for successful engagement in video games, simulations and learning environments. This study investigated the effects of perceived affordances on learned navigation and objective location performance within a virtual world. We hypothesized that such perceived affordances impede the learning of virtual geography by fostering reliance on “artificial” cues instead of real space navigation techniques such as the observation of landmarks, spatial orientation, sense of time and distance travelled. The presence of perceived affordances was not significant in predicting retention accuracy. However, the presence of perceived affordances was a significant predictor of objective location performance.

Publication Title

Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology

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